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Hell Yea Creepy Shit

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Where we go to say HELLS YEA, to the creepy shit.- On this blog you will find all things creepy with zero blood and guts!! If you would like to submit a story go for it!! If you want to ask me a question, any question you're more then welcome to!!



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La Llorona (“The Weeping Woman”) is a widespread legend in  Mexico, Puerto Rico and Central America. Although several variations  exist, the basic story tells of a beautiful woman by the name of Maria  killing her children by drowning them, in order to be with the man that  she loved. When the man rejects her, she kills herself. Challenged at  the gates of heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not  permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is  forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her  drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name “La  Llorona”.
In some versions of the tale, La Llorona kidnaps wandering children,  or children who disobey their parents. People who claim to see her say  she comes out at night or in the late evenings  from rivers or oceans in Mexico. Some believe that those who hear the  wails of La Llorona are marked for death, similar to the Gaelic banshee legend. She is said to cry “Ay, mis hijos! Ay, mis hijos!” which translates to “Oh, my children!”
In another version, she is out when her children are kidnapped,  murdered, and thrown in the Santa Fe River. In grief she kills herself.  When she reaches the pearly gates,  God asks her where her children are. Since she doesn’t have them she  can’t enter the afterlife, so she is forced to wander the earth for  eternity. She is said to claim any children wandering near the river at  night. She puts her long, bony fingers on the child’s shoulder and  says,”Aquí están mis hijos,” or in English ,”Here are my children.”

My grandma used to scare the SHIT out of us with this story.   There is a really longggg dark road leading to my grandmothers in Corpus Christi Tx. There is some light on it now, but back then there was ZERO lights whatsoever. It had to have been maybe in the early 90’s late 80’s My aunt was driving home from her friends house. They were playing cards, or something like that. She had my little cousin asleep in the seat next to her, who had to have been maybe 6 or 7 years old at the time. She says that she was almost home when she came up on a girl standing on the side of the road. She was wearing a Mexican dress similar to this..
 She said that she didn’t become alarmed or anything at first because it wasnt very late, maybe 9 or 10pm. She figured that it was just someone walking on the side of the road. It wasnt until she got closer that she realized that the girl she was seeing was walking funny… she says that she was walking “Too smooth”. She swerved into the other lane because, well she honestly didn’t want to get anywhere near her, even in the car. As soon as my aunt passed her up she looked at her through the passenger side window. My aunt says that the woman was walking with her head down and she couldn’t see her face at all and that her hair looked “wet”  Thats about the time that my aunt started to panic and sped up, my aunt says that she never saw the girl in her rear view mirror. She was just gone. To this day, getting my aunt to retell that story is like pulling teeth.  I do remember she slept with my grandma for a long time around those years. I’m assuming that was the reason.

La Llorona (“The Weeping Woman”) is a widespread legend in Mexico, Puerto Rico and Central America. Although several variations exist, the basic story tells of a beautiful woman by the name of Maria killing her children by drowning them, in order to be with the man that she loved. When the man rejects her, she kills herself. Challenged at the gates of heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name “La Llorona”.

In some versions of the tale, La Llorona kidnaps wandering children, or children who disobey their parents. People who claim to see her say she comes out at night or in the late evenings from rivers or oceans in Mexico. Some believe that those who hear the wails of La Llorona are marked for death, similar to the Gaelic banshee legend. She is said to cry “Ay, mis hijos! Ay, mis hijos!” which translates to “Oh, my children!”

In another version, she is out when her children are kidnapped, murdered, and thrown in the Santa Fe River. In grief she kills herself. When she reaches the pearly gates, God asks her where her children are. Since she doesn’t have them she can’t enter the afterlife, so she is forced to wander the earth for eternity. She is said to claim any children wandering near the river at night. She puts her long, bony fingers on the child’s shoulder and says,”Aquí están mis hijos,” or in English ,”Here are my children.”

My grandma used to scare the SHIT out of us with this story.  There is a really longggg dark road leading to my grandmothers in Corpus Christi Tx. There is some light on it now, but back then there was ZERO lights whatsoever. It had to have been maybe in the early 90’s late 80’s My aunt was driving home from her friends house. They were playing cards, or something like that. She had my little cousin asleep in the seat next to her, who had to have been maybe 6 or 7 years old at the time. She says that she was almost home when she came up on a girl standing on the side of the road. She was wearing a Mexican dress similar to this..

She said that she didn’t become alarmed or anything at first because it wasnt very late, maybe 9 or 10pm. She figured that it was just someone walking on the side of the road. It wasnt until she got closer that she realized that the girl she was seeing was walking funny… she says that she was walking “Too smooth”. She swerved into the other lane because, well she honestly didn’t want to get anywhere near her, even in the car. As soon as my aunt passed her up she looked at her through the passenger side window. My aunt says that the woman was walking with her head down and she couldn’t see her face at all and that her hair looked “wet”  Thats about the time that my aunt started to panic and sped up, my aunt says that she never saw the girl in her rear view mirror. She was just gone. To this day, getting my aunt to retell that story is like pulling teeth.  I do remember she slept with my grandma for a long time around those years. I’m assuming that was the reason.

  1. m3nhavebabies reblogged this from hellyeacreepyshit
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  12. erogurovelp reblogged this from themockingcrows and added:
    !! Reblogging for robby-robs — She was featured as a villain in the first arc of Batwoman. o u o spooky ooky
  13. mexicanime reblogged this from outstrider and added:
    This was my favorite scary story growing up. Fuck the Boogeyman, i was scared of La Llorona.
  14. proxyjammer reblogged this from outstrider
  15. gentleswee reblogged this from outstrider
  16. ambathy reblogged this from outstrider
  17. outstrider reblogged this from themockingcrows
  18. themockingcrows reblogged this from azael-chan and added:
    Agggh, I remember hearing about her.. Creepy shit, man. Creepy shit..
  19. fxckinl reblogged this from firefister
  20. sorashiki reblogged this from officialwodahs
  21. firefister reblogged this from officialwodahs
  22. azael-chan reblogged this from monochrome-monologue and added:
    This is actually an extremely interesting tale. Being in the Pacific Northwest, I’ve never heard it before.
  23. amillionbats reblogged this from officialwodahs
  24. monochrome-monologue reblogged this from officialwodahs
  25. annieleonhardon reblogged this from princess-of-pansexual and added:
    I remember reading about this lady in a book of ghost stories, and when I was explaining this one to my family my...
  26. princess-of-pansexual reblogged this from lawofcycles
  27. lawofcycles reblogged this from thequietofthestream


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